Lama Passage

Feature Type:Passage - Variation of Pass: Narrow stretch of water connecting two larger water bodies.
Status:
Name Authority: BC Geographical Names Office
Relative Location: Between Denny, Campbell and Hunter Islands, Range 3 Coast Land District
Latitude-Longitude: 52°04'49''N, 128°05'50''W at the approximate centre of this feature.
Datum: NAD83
NTS Map: 103A/1
Related Maps: 103A/1
93D/4

Origin Notes and History:

Adopted 3 March 1925 on Hydrographic Services Chart #3720 “Idol Point to Ocean Falls,” as established on British Admiralty Chart #2449, "Lama Passage and Seaforth Channel," in Topographic Trays Vault 50T3.

Source: BC place name cards & correspondence, and/or research by BC Chief Geographer & Geographical Names Office staff, File H.1.25.

A previously recorded name for this passage is Main Passage.

Source: BC place name cards & correspondence, and/or research by BC Chief Geographer & Geographical Names Office staff.

Named after the Hudson's Bay Company brig, Llama, 144 tons, Captain William McNeill, which vessel in company with the brig Dryad brought the men, stores and material from the Columbia River and Nisqually for the establishing of Fort McLoughlin (at Bella Bella) by the Hudson's Bay Company in May 1833. The Llama originaly belonged to the old firm of Bryand & Sturgis, Boston, and sailed from that port for this coast on a trading voyage under the command of McNeill in November 1830. The Llama arrived on the coast, via the Sandwich islands, in May 1831, and shortly after arrival the vessel and cargo were purchased, under singular circumstances, by the Hudson's Bay Company, McNeill remaining in the service of the new owners. In the records of the Hudson's Bay Company the name of the brig is spelt Lama, but in the affidavit of Captain McNeill, given in the San Juan Boundary Question, Appendix North America, 1873, p.30, he spells the name Llama. See also Port McNeill.

Source: Walbran, John T; British Columbia Coast Names, 1592-1906: their origin and history; Ottawa, 1909 (republished for the Vancouver Public Library by J.J. Douglas Ltd, Vancouver, 1971)