Mount Currie

Feature Type:Mount - Variation of Mountain: Mass of land prominently elevated above the surrounding terrain, bounded by steep slopes and rising to a summit and/or peaks. ["Mount" preceding the name usually indicates that the feature is named after a person.]
Status:
Name Authority: BC Geographical Names Office
Relative Location: Just SE of Pemberton at head of Lillooet Lake, Lillooet Land District
Latitude-Longitude: 50°14'55''N, 122°46'55''W at the approximate centre of this feature.
Datum: NAD83
NTS Map: 92J/2
Related Maps: 92J/2
92J/7

Origin Notes and History:

Adopted in the 10th Report of the Geographic Board of Canada, 30 June 1911.

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

Name includes both summits within the 8100' contour on maps 92J/2 and 92J/7; November 1980 letter from mountaineer Karl Ricker advises that "...locals have always associated the high peak as Mt. Currie."

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

After John Currie, pioneer settler at Pemberton Meadows.

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

"After John Currie, Lillooet River settler in the 1870s. Born in Quebec; father came from Isle of Arran, Scotland. His sister, Mrs. McIntosh, a widow, lived with a brother, Ronald Currie, at the old Poole place ("Half Way House") on Pemberton Portage. A masterful type of woman, she gave orders, settled disputes, made matrimonial matches, and was known as "Queen of the Portage." Afterwards, she and Ronald lived at Queen Charlotte Islands."

Source: Provincial Archives of BC "Place Names File" compiled 1945-1950 by A.G. Harvey from various sources, with subsequent additions

The original name for this place is Ts'zil and it is highly regarded by the L'íl'wat Nation. The face of the mountain has been etched by the travels of a giant two-headed serpent and along the northwest ridgeline you can still see rocks standing where L'íl'wat hunters were transformed to stone. (December 2011 from: Cultural Journey Sea-to-Sky Corridor website, Squamish and Lil'wat First Nations)

Source: included with note