Chilkoot Pass

Feature Type:Pass (2) - Low opening in a mountain range or hills, offering a route from one side to the other.
Status:
Name Authority: BC Geographical Names Office
Relative Location: S side of Crater Lake, on BC-Alaska boundary W of Atlin, just NE of Skagway, Cassiar Land District
Latitude-Longitude: 59°41'50''N, 135°14'21''W at the approximate centre of this feature.
Datum: NAD83
NTS Map: 104M/11

Origin Notes and History:

"Chilkoot Pass (not Chilcoot nor Chilcut)" adopted in the 1st Report of the Geographic Board of Canada, 1898, as an established local name.

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

Local name "Chilkoot Portage", according to US Coast & Geodetic Survey, 1890; identified as "Shasheki Pass" in Alaska Coast Pilot, 1883; called "Perrier Pass" by Lieutenant F. Schwatka, USA, 1883; the Indian name "Dejah" was labelled on Arthur and Aurel Krause's map, 1883.

Source: Dictionary of Alaska Place Names, Geological Survey Professional Paper 567; US Department of Interior, Washington, 1967

Chilkoot/Chilcoot/Tschilkut is the name of a tribe of the Tlingit Indians. Their principal village was near the mouth of Chilkoot River, about 12 miles southwest of Skagway, Alaska.

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

"...tl koot (schloodt) is possibly of Eyac origin - can't be analyzed." (advice from G. Lear, Tlingit linguist, Alaska Native Language Center)

Source: included with note

"The first known crossing of this pass by a 'white man' was made in 1864 or 1865 by an employee of the Hudson's Bay Company, who started at Fort Selkirk and was delivered by the Chilkoot Indians to Capt. Swandson [sic], commander of one of the company's steamers. The first expedition to cross the pass was that of George Holt in 1875, who travelled from Lynn Canal to the headwaters of the Yukon River. With the discovery of gold in the Yukon in the 1870's, this pass was used by many prospectors, and during the Klondike Gold Rush in 1896 the Dyea-Chilkoot Pass route became one of the important routes to the gold fields."

Source: Dictionary of Alaska Place Names, Geological Survey Professional Paper 567; US Department of Interior, Washington, 1967