Burrard Inlet

Feature Type:Inlet (3) - Elongated body of water extending from a sea or lake.
Status:
Name Authority: BC Geographical Names Office
Relative Location: N of mouth of Fraser River, New Westminster Land District
Latitude-Longitude: 49°17'55''N, 123°05'07''W at the approximate centre of this feature.
Datum: NAD83
NTS Map: 92G/6
Related Maps: 92G/6
92G/7

Origin Notes and History:

Burrard Inlet adopted in the 1930 BC Gazetteer, as labelled on Trutch's 1871 map, and on BC Lands maps; not Burrard's Channel as identified in Vancouver's Journal (Vol 2, p.194), nor Burrard Canal as identified on British Admiralty Charts. Burrard Inlet confirmed 7 December 1937 on 92 G/6.

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

Western limit of Burrard Inlet is defined by a straight line drawn between Point Atkinson and Point Gray (1939 BC Pilot).

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

Examined by Captain Vancouver in June 1792, and named by him [Burrard's Channel] after his friend, Captain Sir Harry Burrard, Bart, RN, who was an acting lieutenant with Vancouver on the Europa in the West Indies, 1785. Born 16 September 1765, eldest son of Lieutenant Colonel William Burrard, and entered the navy in 1778....see extensive biographical information in Walbran.

Source: Walbran, John T; British Columbia Coast Names, 1592-1906: their origin and history; Ottawa, 1909 (republished for the Vancouver Public Library by J.J. Douglas Ltd, Vancouver, 1971)

The Spanish officers Galiano and Valdes examined this inlet about the same time as Vancouver, and named it Canal de Sasamat, which was understood to be the Indian name, and it is thus given on their chart of 1792. Eliza, another Spanish officer, on his exploring voyage in 1791, had named this inlet Boca de Florida Blanco, and this name Galiano adopted on the large copy of his chart, republished in 1795.

Source: Walbran, John T; British Columbia Coast Names, 1592-1906: their origin and history; Ottawa, 1909 (republished for the Vancouver Public Library by J.J. Douglas Ltd, Vancouver, 1971)

"The north arm of the channel which we called "Floridablanca" [Burrard Inlet], and the natives name "Sasamat," ends in a river of very little consequence which runs down the slopes and by a ravine of a great mountain and is apparently formed by the waters which, coming from the melted snow, rush down from the mountain." (Spanish Explorations in the Strait of Juan de Fuca, by Henry R. Wagner; AMS Press; New York, 1933. p 265, being a translation from Eliza's log, 1791)

Source: included with note