Mount Assiniboine

Feature Type:Mount - Variation of Mountain: Mass of land prominently elevated above the surrounding terrain, bounded by steep slopes and rising to a summit and/or peaks. ["Mount" preceding the name usually indicates that the feature is named after a person.]
Status:
Name Authority: BC Geographical Names Office
Relative Location: On BC-Alberta boundary, NE of Invermere, Kootenay Land District
Latitude-Longitude: 50°52'10''N, 115°39'03''W at the approximate centre of this feature.
Datum: NAD83
NTS Map: 82J/13

Origin Notes and History:

Mount Assiniboine adopted in 1917 by the Geographic Board of Canada, as labelled on BC map 4G, 1914, and on BC-Alberta boundary sheet # 12, 1916.

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

Not named on Palliser's 1857-60 map of British North America; not named on Trutch's 1871 map of BC; named Assiniboine Mtn on George Dawson's Reconnaisance Map of the Rocky Mountains, published in 1886 from 1884 surveys, and so-identified in his accompanying report (Canadian Geological Survey Report, Vol I, 1885); in that report, Dawson mentions several names applied by Palliser, Hector, Blackiston etc, but 'Assiniboine' is not one of them, so presumably Dawson had named the feature.

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

Named after the Assiniboine (Stoney) Indians, who hunted in the Rocky Mountains from the 49th parallel to the North Saskatchewan - Athabasca watershed; the name means "those who cook by placing hot stones in water".

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

"...These Indians were originally from the south and belonged to the Sioux. The Crees called them 'Assin Bwan" (Stony Sioux), hence the name of the river (Assiniboine) on the banks of which they camped. The original name of the river, on an old map, is 'Stone Indian' river, so named from the way in which they heated water to cook with. Stones were made very hot and put into vessels made of the clay on the banks of the river...". (10 March 1913 letter from A.H. Whitcher, Geographic Board of Canada, to James White; published in "Place Names in Vicinity of Yellowhead Pass, Canadian Alpine Journal, vol VI, 1914-15, pp.143-158)

Source: included with note