Sewall

Feature Type:Locality - A named place or area, generally with a scattered population of 50 or less.
Status:
Name Authority: BC Geographical Names Office
Relative Location: N shore of Masset Inlet, Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Land District
Latitude-Longitude: 53°45'55''N, 132°18'00''W at the approximate population centre of this feature.
Datum: NAD83
NTS Map: 103F/16

Origin Notes and History:

"Sewell (Steamer Landing) adopted in the 1930 BC Gazetteer, not "Sewall" as labelled on BC Lands' map 3L, 1919. Form of name changed to Sewell (settlement) 6 February 1948 on C. 3805. Form of name changed and spelling corrected to Sewall (locality) 10 March 1978 on 103F/16, being the correct spelling of the namesake's family name, and as originally labelled on maps.

Source: BC place name cards, files, correspondence and/or research by BC Chief Geographer/Geographical Names Office.

Named after Samuel Dart Sewall, one of the officials in the Star Realty Company formed in 1911 to promote the townsite. The site had been tentatively named Star City until developers settled on the name Sewall. The incorrect spelling "Sewell" in 1930 Gazetteer & subsequent government maps likely arose because of the relative proximity of Sewell Inlet on Moresby Island. Correct spelling of namesake's family name was verified in September 1968 from signature of Samuel Dart Sewall on Land Registry Plan 1036, dated 12 April 1913, for SW 1/4 Lot 1577, QC District.

Source: BC place name cards, files, correspondence and/or research by BC Chief Geographer/Geographical Names Office.

Sewall Post Office was opened 1 September 1917; closed 24 March 1919.

Source: BC place name cards, files, correspondence and/or research by BC Chief Geographer/Geographical Names Office.

"At one time the site was a promising real estate venture.... The venture got off to a good start - by the end of 1913 seventy families had settled at Sewall - but with no possibility of a road connection and a waterfront which is a horror for boats, it had little change of real success, especially with the tough townsiting competition going on at that time. After the First World War as the families moved away, Paul Bastian, one of the original homesteaders, bought most of the land and remained to raise his family there...." (see also Kathleen Dalzell's The Queen Charlotte Islands; Evergreen Press, 1968; Chapter 39: The Story of Sewall, for a description of settlement attempt by a group of Icelandic people from Winnipeg to form a colony at Sewall.)

Source: Dalzell, Kathleen E; Queen Charlotte Islands - Book 2: of places and names; Prince Rupert: Cove Press, 1973