Douglas

Feature Type:Community - An unincorporated populated place, generally with a population of 50 or more, and having a recognized central area that might contain a post office, store and/or community hall, etc, intended for the use of the general public in the region.
Status:
Name Authority: BC Geographical Names Office
Relative Location: On BC-Washington boundary, SE of White Rock in South Surrey, New Westminster Land District
Latitude-Longitude: 49°00'10''N, 122°44'08''W at the approximate population centre of this feature.
Datum: NAD83
NTS Map: 92G/2
Related Maps: 92G/1
92G/2

Origin Notes and History:

Douglas (Customs Post) adopted 4 July 1957 on 92G/SE. Form of name changed to Douglas (settlement) 15 September 1966 on 92G/SE.

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

According to April 1956 advice from Canada Customs Department, their facility on the Pacific Highway at Douglas and their facility about 1 mile west of here (adjacent to Semiahmoo Bay at the Peace Arch) are collectively administered as the "Port of Pacific Highway." Commercial vehicles and cars are diverted accordingly.

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

This settlement was laid out by pioneering settler Benjamin Douglas, who also laid out Huntingdon, a few miles east of here in Abbotsford.

Source: Nelson, Denys; Place Names of the Delta of the Fraser River; 1927, unpublished manuscript held in the Provincial Archives

...Benjamin Douglas came to the Cariboo goldfields in 1862; proprietor of a harness shop, postmaster and JP at Yale; came to New Westminster 1884; promoter of the New Westminster-Vancouver tramway, which was opened 1891; president of New Westminster & Southern Railway; alderman, New Westminster 1885-6; called this townsite "Blane [sic] B.C." and subdivided it in 1889. He also founded Huntingdon.

Source: Provincial Archives' Place Names File (the "Harvey File") compiled 1945-1950 by A.G. Harvey from various sources, with subsequent additions

Parks Canada has installed a National Historic Site tablet at the Peace Arch Crossing, to commemorate the signing of the Oregon Treaty of 1846, whereby, "...prior to the establishment of the Dominion of Canada in 1867, Great Britain and the United States reached a peaceful settlement to a difficult boundary problem, and strengthened the ties existing between the two peoples."

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office