Burgoyne Bay

Feature Type:Bay - Water area in an indentation of the shoreline of a sea, lake, or large river.
Status:
Name Authority: BC Geographical Names Office
Relative Location: W side of Saltspring Island, S of Baynes Peak, Cowichan Land District
Latitude-Longitude: 48°47'44''N, 123°32'16''W at the approximate centre of this feature.
Datum: NAD83
NTS Map: 92B/13

Origin Notes and History:

Adopted in the 10th Report of the Geographic Board of Canada, 30 June 1911, as labelled on British Admiralty Chart 1917, 1865 et seq.

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

Named in 1859 by Captain Richards, after Commander Hugh Talbot Burgoyne VC, an officer aboard HMS Ganges under Captain Fulford. Burgoyne had been awarded the VC for gallant action during the Crimean war.

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

When the American merchant ship Northern Eagle was burned in Esquimalt Harbour, Captain Burgoyne was highly commended for his efforts to save everything possible from the burning ship. Seamen from the Ganges, Pylades, Tribune, and Plumper also assisted. In April of 1870, Captain Burgoyne placed the ill fated turret ship, Captain, in commission, only to completely turn upside down and founder off Cape Finisterre, with most of the five hundred crew, including Captain Burgoyne and Captain Cowper Coles (the designer) perishing. [CGNDB source not cited]

Source: Canadian Geographical Names Database, Ottawa

Burgoyne Bay Post Office was opened 1 May 1880; closed 29 February 1900. Presumably it was located at the head of this bay.

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

" [Saltspring Island]....Captain Richards when surveying here evidently wished to associate the island with Rear Admiral Baynes, commanding at the time, 1857-1860, the Pacific station, his flagship, staff and officers etc. He therefore named the highest mountain Baynes, and the island Admiral; Ganges harbour after the flagship; Fulford harbour after the captain; Burgoyne bay after the commander; Southey point after the admiral's secretary; Mount Bruce after the previous commander in chief; and Cape Keppel after a friend of Admiral Baynes."

Source: Walbran, John T; British Columbia Coast Names, 1592-1906: their origin and history; Ottawa, 1909 (republished for the Vancouver Public Library by J.J. Douglas Ltd, Vancouver, 1971)