Mount Nkwala

Feature Type:Mount - Variation of Mountain: Mass of land prominently elevated above the surrounding terrain, bounded by steep slopes and rising to a summit and/or peaks. ["Mount" preceding the name usually indicates that the feature is named after a person.]
Status:
Name Authority: BC Geographical Names Office
Relative Location: SW side of Okanagan Lake, in Penticton, Osoyoos Division Yale Land District
Latitude-Longitude: 49°31'43''N, 119°38'28''W at the approximate centre of this feature.
Datum: NAD83
NTS Map: 82E/12

Origin Notes and History:

Niggertoe Mountain adopted 1 December 1955 on 82E/SW. Name changed to Mount Nkwala 29 April 1966 on 82 E/NW.

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

In October 1965 the Canadian Permanent Committee on Geographical Names reached a unanimous decision that objectionable place names in Canada (such as "nigger") should be replaced on maps. The chairman of the Canadian Confederation Centennial Committee of British Columbia received a proposal in November 1965 from the BC and Yukon Council of the Boy Scouts of Canada, to change the name to "Jamboree Mountain" in recognition of the Boy Scouts gathering to be held in British Columbia in 1966, at Penticton; endorsement received from Penticton & Summerland Chambers of Commerce. Not supported by the Okanagan Historical Society - no weight, dignity or lasting worth - and no recognizable association with British Columbia's or Canada's centenaries [1966 and 1967, respectively)] The Penticton Branch of the Okanagan Historical Society recommended the name "Nkwala Mountain" in January 1966, being the name of several important ancestral Okanagan chiefs, and also the title of an award-winning novel about a Salish boy who lived at the foot of Okanagan Lake (file K.1.55)

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

"Nkwala" is the title of a novel by Miss Edith Lambert Sharp of Penticton, about a Salish Indian boy growing from childhood to manhood. His tribe, the Spokane, migrated from a drought-stricken area to settle at the foot of Okanagan Lake with their related tribe, the Okanagan. The novel won the Little Brown of Canada Award, the Governor General's Medal and a Hans Christian Anderson Diploma of Merit from Luxembourg when it was published in 1958. Copy in Geographical Names Office, Victoria. See also Nicola Lake and Nicola River.

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office