BC Geographical Names

Name Details:

Name: Clo-oose
Feature TypeClick here for a list of
Feature Types.
:
Locality - A named place or area, with or without a scattered population
StatusClick here for an explanation of Status.: Official
Pronounced: kloo owse
Relative Location: On Claoose IR4, just SW of W end Nitinat Lake, Pacific Rim National Park, Renfrew Land District
Latitude-LongitudeClick here for an explanation of Position Type.: 48°39'00''N, 124°49'00''W at the approximate population centre of this feature.
DatumClick here for an explanation of Datum.: NAD27
NTS MapClick here for an explanation of NTS Map.: 92C/10
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Origin Notes and History:

Clo-oose (Post Office & Village) adopted 3 April 1934 on C.3607, as labelled on BC map 2A, 1913, and as identified in the 1930 BC Gazetteer. Identified as Clo-oose (Post Office & Steamer Landing) in the 1966 BC Gazetteer. Form of name changed to Clo-oose (Locality) 15 February 1983 on 92C/10.
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
Clo-oose Post Office was opened 1 September 1911; relocated from Lot 527 to IR4 in 1960; relocated to L57, 1961. Post Office closed 11 August 1966.
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
"Home village of the Nitinat Band of Nootka Indian tribesmen; the name Clo-oose means safe landing." (S.J. Hartnell, Industrial Timber Mills Bulletin, Youbou, October 1933); Clo-oose means "stop to camp" (Victoria Colonist, Islander magazine, 7 August 1966); Clo-oose (also spelled Kloos, Klahus) means "other mens' houses" (Victoria Colonist, Islander magazine, 1 July 1967)
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
"Clo-oose, situated about a mile eastward of the entrance to Nitinat lake, is at this date (1906) the principle village in the neighbourhood."
Source: Walbran, John T; British Columbia Coast Names, 1592-1906: their origin and history; Ottawa, 1909 (republished for the Vancouver Public Library by J.J. Douglas Ltd, Vancouver, 1971)
"Derived from the Nitinaht Indian word meaning 'campsite beach.' Before the village was built, the site was a favourite resting spot for halibut fishermen. In the years before World War I, a Victoria real estate promoter sold nearby land to well-to-do English families, some of whom built fine houses. Evidently not happy with the Indian name Clo-oose for their postal address, they petitioned unsuccessfully to have the name changed to Clovelly."
Source: Akrigg, Helen B. and Akrigg, G.P.V; British Columbia Place Names; Sono Nis Press, Victoria 1986 /or University of British Columbia Press 1997