Mount Burwell

Feature Type:Mount - Variation of Mountain: Mass of land prominently elevated above the surrounding terrain, bounded by steep slopes and rising to a summit and/or peaks. ["Mount" preceding the name usually indicates that the feature is named after a person.]
Status:
Name Authority: BC Geographical Names Office
Relative Location: E side Lynn Creek, N of North Vancouver, New Westminster Land District
Latitude-Longitude: 49°26'33''N, 123°00'55''W at the approximate centre of this feature.
Datum: NAD83
NTS Map: 92G/6

Origin Notes and History:

Adopted 2 November 1927 on 92G/6 as labelled on 1926 topographic survey by A.J. Campbell in association with Burwell Creek and Lake; not White Mountain as named in 1908 by BC Mountaineering Club first ascent party, and labelled on BC map 2D, 1923.

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

Named by Greater Vancouver Water Board, after Herbert Mahlon Burwell (1863 - 1925). Born and educated in London, Ontario, where he received a commission as a Dominion Land Surveyor and an Ontario Land Surveyor (dates not cited). Arrived in Vancouver in the fall of 1887, and in the spring of 1888 joined the firm of Gardener & Hermon, which had been established in late 1886. In the spring of 1906 Mr. Burwell's firm were employed by the City of Vancouver to take charge of their water supply. Mr. Burwell had personal charge of the new joint main on Capilano Creek, from the intake to the first narrows (sic), and built the intake and settling basins. In 1913 Mr. Burwell retired from the firm of Hermon & Burwell, but continued to practise as a consulting engineer until his death 30 July 1925, age 62. A great lover of the outdoors, Mr. Burwell wrote many articles about fishing on the streams and lakes of BC; he was an authority on that branch of sport. More complete biography on file B.1.28.

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

1908 BCMC part called this White Mountain because of its bare, bleached-like top.

Source: Provincial Archives of BC "Place Names File" compiled 1945-1950 by A.G. Harvey from various sources, with subsequent additions