Morrissey

Feature Type:Locality - A named place or area, generally with a scattered population of 50 or less.
Status:
Name Authority: BC Geographical Names Office
Relative Location: S of Fernie, Kootenay Land District
Latitude-Longitude: 49°23'00''N, 115°01'00''W at the approximate population centre of this feature.
Datum: NAD27
NTS Map: 82G/6

Origin Notes and History:

Morrissey (town) adopted in the 13th Report of the Geographic Board of Canada, 31 March 1914, as labelled on BC Lands map of East & West Kootenay, 1902. See Morrissey (locality). Identified as Morrissey (village) in the 18th Report, GBC. Form of name changed to Morrissey (station) 11 February 1963 on 82G/SW. Form of name changed to Morrissey (locality) 29 November 1984 (Ottawa file 203-2).

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

Morrissey Post Office was opened 1 November 1902; closed 28 January 1914; re-opened 15 May 1914; closed 3 December 1918. "Morrissey B.C. is at present almost deserted. [The] building we did have 9 years ago was burnt and not rebuilt owing to the uncertainty of mines not working. The Morrissey Mines Town is served from this Post Office central for both Railway Depots... the PO serves the section hands of the 2 railroads who really comprise [most of the] patrons. Only one hotel and comparatively no hotel trade. Town can't support any grocery store at present. Fernie supplies all wants except the [hotel] bar here with a limited trade of casual callers." (11 September 1913 letter from Morrissey postmaster James Ellingworth; with sketch on PO card)

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

"After James Morrissey, who with Michael Phillips and John Ridgway cut out the Croswnest Pass trail from the site of present Elko to Crowsnest Lake." (18th Report GBC, published as a supplement to the Annual Report of the Department of the Interior, 1924)

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

After James Morrissey, Kootenay miner of the 1870s. Identified as 'labourer, Wild Horse Creek' on 1879 Voters List; identified on subsequent voters list (date not cited) as 'miner, Kootenay'.

Source: Provincial Archives of BC "Place Names File" compiled 1945-1950 by A.G. Harvey from various sources, with subsequent additions

"After James Morrissey who, with John Ridgway, some time around 1878 cut out a trail from Elk to Crowsnest Lake. They are said to have found the first samples of coal in this area while blazing this trail."

Source: Akrigg, Helen B. and Akrigg, G.P.V; 1001 British Columbia Place Names; Discovery Press, Vancouver 1969, 1970, 1973.