BC Geographical Names

Name Details:

Name: Albion
Feature TypeClick here for a list of
Feature Types.
:
Community
StatusClick here for an explanation of Status.: Official
Relative Location: N side of Fraser River, in Maple Ridge District Municipality, New Westminster Land District
Latitude-LongitudeClick here for an explanation of Position Type.: 49°11'00''N, 122°33'00''W at the approximate population centre of this feature.
DatumClick here for an explanation of Datum.: NAD27
NTS MapClick here for an explanation of NTS Map.: 92G/2
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Origin Notes and History:

Albion (Post Office) adopted 11 February 1936 on 92 G/2, as labelled on provincial maps since 1912. Form of name changed to Albion (Community) 15 December 1982 on 92 G/2.
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
Albion Post Office opened 1 October 1907 situated on DL 407; William Ritchie, postmaster.
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
Early name of the district was East Haney. When growth brought a school and post office, and names were required for each, a committee of settlers suggested Albion, the ancient Celtic name for Britain [Albion is said to be the oldest known name for Britain, derived from the Latin "albus" (white), referring to the white chalk cliffs of southern England. Note, however, that this name was in use long before the Romans arrived. Some scholars say that albion means simply "the land" in the Celtic language.]
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
Daily Province, 20 September 1925, tells how Alex Forrest recounted the first stopping of the trains at Albion: A lady whose weight was not to be lightly estimated asked to be allowed to get off there, and he, being the official to consult, asked the engineer to oblige, the night being too stormy for any woman to have to walk from Haney back again... A week later a number of men demanded the same priviledge saying that the lady had been accommodated a week previously, with the result that Albion became a regular stopping place for trains.
Source: Nelson, Denys; Place Names of the Delta of the Fraser River; 1927, unpublished manuscript held in the Provincial Archives