BC Geographical Names

Name Details:

Name: Brownsville
Feature TypeClick here for a list of
Feature Types.
:
Former Locality - A once-populated place with no current population or that is usually uninhabite
StatusClick here for an explanation of Status.: Not official.
Relative Location: E side Fraser River opposite New Westminster, New Westminster Land District
Latitude-LongitudeClick here for an explanation of Position Type.: 49°12'20''N, 122°53'00''W at the approximate population centre of this feature.
DatumClick here for an explanation of Datum.: NAD27
NTS MapClick here for an explanation of NTS Map.: 92G/2
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Origin Notes and History:

Brownsville Post Office opened 1 February 1891, John Beaton postmaster; closed 31 December 1903.
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
Located opposite New Westminster where the city at one time ran a ferry. Named after Ebenezer Brown ( - 1883), a well-known citizen in the early days who owned property at the point. Here stood Punch's Hotel, a famous hostelry. The area is now generally known as South Westminster. Ebenezer Brown had come to BC from England in either 1858 or 1859, a stonemason by trade. He erected the international boundary monument at Point Roberts, but did no other building so far as I know. Elected MLA for the district of New Westminster and went into the Cabinet as President of the Council. The clash of interests about that time in connection with railway building led to his retirement from office. (14 January 1927 letter from John C. Brown, ex-MLA).
Source: Nelson, Denys; Place Names of the Delta of the Fraser River; 1927, unpublished manuscript held in the Provincial Archives
This was the former site of Kikait, the summer dwelling or camp of the Kwantlen tribe, one of the Halkomaylem division of the Cowichan group of the Salish stock, of the lower Fraser Valley. The Kwantlen tribe having enslaved the Coquitlam tribe, the latter were driven from their camp where New Westminster stands today, and were compelled to fill in the marshy flats at Brownsville or Kikait with gravel and stones, to form a summer fishing camp for their conquerors. Here, it is claimed, Fraser spent a night on his way down and again on his way back up the river.
Source: Nelson, Denys; Place Names of the Delta of the Fraser River; 1927, unpublished manuscript held in the Provincial Archives