BC Geographical Names

Name Details:

Name: Mount Bishop
Feature TypeClick here for a list of
Feature Types.
:
Mount - Variation of Mountain: Mass of land prominently elevated above the surrounding terrain, bounded by steep slopes and rising to a summit and/or peaks. [if "Mount" precedes the name, usually indicates that the feature is named after a person.
StatusClick here for an explanation of Status.: Official
Relative Location: N of Elsay Lake, between Seymour River and Indian Arm at NW side of Mount Seymour Provincial Park, New Westminster Land District
Latitude-LongitudeClick here for an explanation of Position Type.: 49°25'49''N, 122°55'38''W at the approximate centre of this feature.
DatumClick here for an explanation of Datum.: NAD83
NTS MapClick here for an explanation of NTS Map.: 92G/7
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Origin Notes and History:

Bishop Mountain adopted in the 1930 BC Gazetteer, as labelled on BC map 5B, 1929; form changed to Mount Bishop 3 May 1951 on 92G, as had been labelled on BC map 2B, 1914.
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
Labelled "Godfrey Mtn" on 1915 watershed map, but never submitted or considered for adoption. Origin/significance not known.
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
After Joseph Charles Bishop (1851 - 1913), of Bishop and Christie, Vancouver photographers. A leading mountaineer, founder and first president of the BC Mountaineering Club 1907-1910 (called that the time Vancouver Mountaineering Club). Bishop was killed in a fall into a crevass on Mount Baker in July 1913, his body recovered and buried 25 July 1913. First recorded ascent of Mount Bishop is credited to a 9 August 1908 BC Mountaineering Club party of 19, led by Fred Mills. [note: BC name files do not indicate if this feature was named in August 1908 by the first-ascent party, or if BCMC assigned this name as a commemorative gesture following Bishop's death.]
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office