BC Geographical Names

Name Details:

Name: Niggertoe Mountain
Feature TypeClick here for a list of
Feature Types.
:
Mountain - Mass of land prominently elevated above the surrounding terrain, bounded by steep slopes and rising to a summit and/or peaks
StatusClick here for an explanation of Status.: Not official. Lookup the official name
Relative Location: SW side of Okanagan Lake, in Penticton, Osoyoos Division Yale Land District
Latitude-LongitudeClick here for an explanation of Position Type.: 49°31'43''N, 119°38'28''W at the approximate centre of this feature.
DatumClick here for an explanation of Datum.: NAD83
NTS MapClick here for an explanation of NTS Map.: 82E/12
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Origin Notes and History:

Niggertoe Mountain adopted 1 December 1955 on 82E/NW, citing 12th Report of the Okanagan Historical Society, 1948, as the source of this established local name. Name changed to Mount Nkwala 29 April 1966 on 82 E/NW.
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
Incorrectly labelled at 49°30' x 119°42' on 82E/NW ed.1. Application altered to the 3340' summit closer to the shore of Okanagan Lake in the vicinity of 49°32' x 119°38', from information received in the field July-August 1956 by M. Browne, Geographic Division; the BC Forest Service forest fire lookout on this mountain is known as "Jerry's Lookout" or "Jerry Lookout" (file K.1.55)
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
"Nigger Toe Mountain: c3400', between Penticton & Summerland. When or by whom this name was given is not on record. The origin seems to be a tragic affair that began on Christmas Day, 1908, when three negroes, Charles Blair, cook, Arthur Wilson, his assistant, and Arthur Chapman, waiter, all employed at the Hotel Summerland, got lost in a snowstorm while returning from Mass at Penticton. One of them was thrown from his horse and efforts by the others to catch it led to their being thrown too. Blair had been drinking and was unable to travel afoot. Wilson and Chapman wandered about looking for one another or for help until night came on. Chapman fell asleep from exhaustion and Blair from his liquor - never to awaken - their bodies being found near the foot of the mountain next day. Inquest verdict - death from exposure. Wilson, the survivor, slept less and moved about more than the others, eventually reaching Summerland." (12th Report of the Okanagan Historical Society, 1948, citing Summerland Review, 2 January 1909)
Source: included with note