BC Geographical Names

Name Details:

Name: Mount Gunanoot
Feature TypeClick here for a list of
Feature Types.
:
Mount - Variation of Mountain: Mass of land prominently elevated above the surrounding terrain, bounded by steep slopes and rising to a summit and/or peaks. [if "Mount" precedes the name, usually indicates that the feature is named after a person.
StatusClick here for an explanation of Status.: Official
Relative Location: Surrounded by the headwaters of the Klappan, Nass, Spatsizi and Skeena Rivers, E of Bob Quinn Lake (community), Cassiar Land District
Latitude-LongitudeClick here for an explanation of Position Type.: 57°06'41''N, 128°53'40''W at the approximate centre of this feature.
DatumClick here for an explanation of Datum.: NAD83
NTS MapClick here for an explanation of NTS Map.: 104H/2
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Origin Notes and History:

Adopted 14 July 1945 on 104/SE, as labelled on plan 1T183, Topographic Survey of Groundhog Coal Area, by T. Rognass, 1914.
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
Gun-a-noot was guide for the party building the southern section of the Yukon Telegraph Line and did not want the line to pass through his trapping grounds on the Bell-Irving River so guided them eastward. Consequently the northern party did not meet the southern at the shortest route and point intended, necessitating the construction, in the following year, of a junction from the mouth of Rochester Creek to the mouth of Teigen Creek on the Bell-Irving River. Gun-a-noot and his father are both buried on the north shore of Bowser Lake. (P.M. Monckton, BCLS). See also Gunanoot Lake.
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
"This camping ground is a famous rendevous for the Indians hunting in the district, and is known as the 'Indian Graveyard' from the fact that a number of Indians have been buried there; [they] keep a lot of whipsawed lumber here to make coffins in case of emergency. The fugitive Indian, Gun-a-noot, uses this as a headquarters, and buried one of the women of his family here last season." (BC Mines Report 1912, p.84, referring to the site on Little Klappan River where, flowing northerly near its source, it makes a sharp turn to the northwest.) [this location understood to be in the vicinity of 54 40 30 - 129 23 30.]
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office