BC Geographical Names

Name Details:

Name: Robson Bight
Feature TypeClick here for a list of
Feature Types.
:
Bight - Water area in a broad indentation of the shoreline
StatusClick here for an explanation of Status.: Official
Relative Location: W end Johnstone Strait, SE of Telegraph Cove, Rupert Land District
Latitude-LongitudeClick here for an explanation of Position Type.: 50°29'17''N, 126°35'35''W at the approximate centre of this feature.
DatumClick here for an explanation of Datum.: NAD83
NTS MapClick here for an explanation of NTS Map.: 92L/7
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Origin Notes and History:

Adopted 2 May 1933 on Geological Survey sheet, Nimpkish, as labelled on British Admiralty Chart 581, 1867 et seq.
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
Named in 1861 by Captain Richards, RN, after Lieut. Commander Charles Rufus Robson, HM gunboat "Forward", who had distinguished himself as a naval officer on several occasions, including his prompt action in proceeding, December 1860, from Nootka Sound to the wreck of the American brig "Consort" in San Josef Bay, for which Robson was recommended to US President Buchanan as worthy of national recognition (Colonist 14 February 1861). Robson died at Victoria 5 November 1861, from the effects of a fall from his horse (Colonist 29 October, 6 November and 8 November, 1861). See Walbran's British Columbia Coast Names for additional biographical information.
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
The traditional name for this site was Usaq, said to mean "gray haired", referring to the appearance of burnt or dead trees; this was a place of origin and an old village site, utilized as a fishing station. According to Boas, this was a place of origin for the Komkiutis (Boas, Franz, "Geographical Names of the Kwakiutl Indians" Columbia University Contributions to Anthropology 20, New York, 1934,map 11/6). At the 1914 McKenna McBride Commission hearings, both the Matilpi and the Tlawitsis claimed this location; oral history and documentary souces suggest that there was a shifting of territorial boundaries in this area in the late 1800s-early 1900s. (Galois, Robert, "Kwakwaka'wakw Settlements, 1775 - 1920: A geographical analysis and Gazeteer" UBC Press, Vancouver, 1994, maps Mt 19, Tt 15)
Source: Museum at Campbell River (spring 2001)