BC Geographical Names

Name Details:

Name: Fairweather Mountain
Feature TypeClick here for a list of
Feature Types.
:
Mountain - Mass of land prominently elevated above the surrounding terrain, bounded by steep slopes and rising to a summit and/or peaks
StatusClick here for an explanation of Status.: Official
Relative Location: On BC-Alaska boundary, SW of Skagway, Alaska, Cassiar Land District
Latitude-LongitudeClick here for an explanation of Position Type.: 58°54'23''N, 137°31'36''W at the approximate centre of this feature.
DatumClick here for an explanation of Datum.: NAD83
NTS MapClick here for an explanation of NTS Map.: 114I/13
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Origin Notes and History:

Fairweather Mountain adopted in the 18th Report of the Geographic Board of Canada, 31 March 1924, as labelled on BC map 1H, 1917; not "Mount Fairweather" as adopted in 1922 by United States Board on Geographic Names [since adjusted to Fairweather Mountain in U.S. records.]
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
Named in 1778 by Captain James Cook presumably because of the good weather encountered at the time of his visit (Journals... 1785, vol 2, p.345). The name has been variously translated: "Mt. Beautemps" by La Pérouse, 1786; "Mte. Buen-tiempo" by Galiano, 1802; "Gor[a]-Khoroshy-pogody" on Russian Hydrographic Chart 1378, 1847; "G[ora] Fayerveder" by Capt Tebenkov, Imperial Russian Navy, 1852; "Schönwetterberg" by C.Grewingk, 1850. The Tlingit name is reportedly "Tanaku".
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
First ascent credited to Allen Carpé and Terris Moore 8 June 1931. See Carpe's "The Conquest of Mount Fairweather" Alpine Journal, 43: 221-231. Second ascent 26 June 1958, by an all-Canadian climbing party, to mark the centennial of the Crown Colony of British Columbia. See description in Canadian Alpine Journal, vol XLII, 1959, pp 1-20. See also "Mount Fairweather, The First Ten Ascents" by Bradford Washburn, American Alpine Journal (full citation not recorded)
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
Straddles the international boundary between Canada/British Columbia and the United States/Alaska. Boundary Point # 164, established in 1907, elevation 15,300 ft. (Report of the International Boundary Commission, 1952, p.175). The highest peak in British Columbia. Elevation 4671m per 1:20,000 provincial baseline atlas 114I.093.
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office