BC Geographical Names

Name Details:

Name: Cayoosh Creek
Feature TypeClick here for a list of
Feature Types.
:
Creek (1) - Watercourse, usually smaller than a river
StatusClick here for an explanation of Status.: Official
Relative Location: Flows NE into Seton River at Lillooet, Lillooet Land District
Latitude-LongitudeClick here for an explanation of Position Type.: 50°40'07''N, 121°58'21''W at the approximate mouth of this feature.
DatumClick here for an explanation of Datum.: NAD83
NTS MapClick here for an explanation of NTS Map.: 92I/12
Related MapClick here for an explanation of Related Maps.: 92I/12
92J/8
92J/9
  Nearby names within
  

Origin Notes and History:

"Cayoosh Creek (not Cayoose)" adopted in the 15th Report of the Geographic Board of Canada, 31 March 1917, as labelled on Geological Survey "Map of a portion of the Southern Interior of British Columbia" by G.M. Dawson, 1887, and as submitted by BC to Geographic Board of Canada in April 1911.
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
Spelled variously Kayoosch, Cayoush, Cayoosch, Cayush, Cayuse, etc. on maps & correspondence dating from Lieut. Mayne's 1859 map, and despatches between Governor Douglas and Moody from September 1860 onward. (see "Sapper Duffy's Exploration" by R.C. Harris, BC Historical News Vol 14 No.2, 1980; copy received February 1981, file P.1.65). The upper reaches (flowing north into Duffy Lake) were labelled "James River" on September 1860 map "Exploration of the Indian trail up Cayoosh Creek to Lillooet Lake" by Sapper James Duffy, RE. (reproduction in BC Historical News, ibid). Sketch map showing named mineral claims along Cayoosh Creek received April 1917 from Casper Phair (file 34275s, pt 1)
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
"The word means horse and is supposed to refer to a dead horse having been found in it." (1 April 1911 name submission to Geographic Board of Canada by W.F. Robertson, BC member of the board). On the other hand, in an earlier letter to GBC dated 14 December 1901, Robertson had stated "Cayoosh Creek...was the Indian name before whites came in, and is not a corruption of the word Cayuse, meaning 'horse'. "
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
"The creek got its name in 1860-61 because nearly every packer in the country watered his pack animals here. In 1861 the winter was severe, with deep snow, and all the animals died."
Source: 15th Report of the Geographic Board of Canada, 31 March 1917 (supplement to the Annual Report of the Dept of the Interior, 1917, Ottawa)
Named by Hutchinson, a packer, whose Cayoosh horses were lost when they fell in this creek [date not cited]. In turn, Cayoosh horses take their name from a district near the mouth of the Columbia River. [presumably the ponies were indigenous to the Cayoosh district.]
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
Traditional name: Tsammuk. ("No Better Land: The 1860 Diaries of the Anglican Colonial Bishop, George Hills", by Roberta Bagshaw, Sono Nis Press, Victoria, 1996, p.180).
Source: included with note
Traditional name Tsho-ha-mous. (Appendix II: Shuswap Names of Places..., Report on the area of the Kamloops mapsheet, by George M. Dawson, Geological Survey of Canada, Annual Report Vol VII, 1894, p.401B.
Source: included with note