Kitamaat Village

Feature Type:Community - An unincorporated populated place, generally with a population of 50 or more, and having a recognized central area that might contain a post office, store and/or community hall, etc, intended for the use of the general public in the region.
Status:
Name Authority: BC Geographical Names Office
Relative Location: E side of Kitimat Arm at head of Douglas Channel, just SE of Kitimat (municipality), Range 4 Coast Land District
Latitude-Longitude: 53°58'30''N, 128°39'00''W at the approximate population centre of this feature.
Datum: NAD83
NTS Map: 103H/15

Origin Notes and History:

Kitimat Mission (settlement) adopted 14 June 1946 on 103SE. Name changed to Kitamaat Village (community) 29 March 1976 on 103H/15, at the same location as Haisla Post Office.

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

Kitimat Mission was established on Kitimat Indian Reserve 2 in the 1890's, in a village that their Tsimshian neighbours called "Gitamaat" meaning "people of the snow." The name Kitimat Mission was last used generally in the 1930's, instead it became known locally as Kitamaat Village. The residents call themselves Haisla ("dwellers downriver"). See also Kitimat River.

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

Kitamaat Post Office was opened 1 March 1900, located on IR 2. Name changed to Kitamaat Mission Post Office 1 May 1908. Spelling changed to Kitimat Mission Post Office sometime in December 1908. Kitimat Mission Post Office closed 25 April 1943. To avoid confusion with a 'new' Kitimat Post Office which had been opened in 1952 at the Alcan site at the head of Kitimat Arm, the postal facility opened 5 July 1976 in Kitamaat Village was named Haisla Post Office.

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

Roman Catholic mission established here in the 1890's, with evidence that the church established influence much earlier: "We left Fort Rupert 15 March 1864, crossed to the Mainland, sailed northwards up the coast and reached Kitimat four days later... at Kitimat Father Jean-Marie Le Jacq baptised some children...." (from the journal of Father Leon Fouquet, excerpted in "Cross in the Wilderness" by Kay Cronin; Mitchell Press, Vancouver, 1961, p.103; being a history of the pioneer Oblate Fathers of British Columbia)

Source: included with note