BC Geographical Names

Name Details:

Name: Mount Pereleshin
Feature TypeClick here for a list of
Feature Types.
:
Mount - Variation of Mountain: Mass of land prominently elevated above the surrounding terrain, bounded by steep slopes and rising to a summit and/or peaks. [if "Mount" precedes the name, usually indicates that the feature is named after a person.
StatusClick here for an explanation of Status.: Official
Relative Location: SE side of junction of Scud and Stikine Rivers, SW of Telegraph Creek (community), Cassiar Land District
Latitude-LongitudeClick here for an explanation of Position Type.: 57°14'04''N, 131°43'35''W at the approximate centre of this feature.
DatumClick here for an explanation of Datum.: NAD83
NTS MapClick here for an explanation of NTS Map.: 104G/4
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Origin Notes and History:

Pereleshin Mountain adopted in the 18th Report of the Geographic Board of Canda, 31 March 1924; confirmed 5 February 1945 on 104SE. Form of name changed to Mount Pereleshin 6 May 1954 on 104G.
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
Likely named in late May 1863 by American scientist and professor, Willliam P. Blake, after Russian naval lieutenant Pereleshin. To protect Russia's jurisdiction in the event of further gold strikes west of the Stikine River (ie. in Russian territory), Admiral Popoff of the Russian Imperial Navy had ordered Lieutenant Pereleshin to lead an exploration party up the Stikine River. Blake was invited to accompany the party and his journal is the only account of the trip. The party left the Stikine estuary 23 May 1863 and camped the 6th night just above a large glacier (today's Flood Glacier) on the right bank of the Stikine River, opposite this imposing mountain. "Pereleshin Mtn" is labelled on W.P. Blake's 1868 map, to accompany his "Geographical Notes upon Russian America and the Stickeen River, being a report addressed to the Hon. W.H. Seward, Secretary of State" (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1868, pp 9-17).
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
Elevation of 6200 feet. "Peerleshin, which has been incorrectly described as a native name, originated with an accidental transposition of letters."
Source: Canadian Geographical Names Database, Ottawa
An incorrect interpretation appears in Dictionary of Alaska Place Names, by Don Orth (Geological Survey professional paper 567, Washington, 1967): "A native name, from Geodetic & Coast Survey. Has been written Peerleshin and Pereleshin, ie. Pereles River. (citing Marcus Baker, USGS Bulletin 299, 1906)"
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office