BC Geographical Names

Name Details:

Name: Kamloops
Feature TypeClick here for a list of
Feature Types.
:
City - A populated place with legally defined boundaries, incorporated under the provincial Municipal Act
StatusClick here for an explanation of Status.: Official
Relative Location: At junction of North and South Thompson Rivers, Kamloops Division Yale Land District
Latitude-LongitudeClick here for an explanation of Position Type.: 50°40'33''N, 120°20'22''W at the approximate population centre of this feature.
DatumClick here for an explanation of Datum.: NAD83
NTS MapClick here for an explanation of NTS Map.: 92I/9
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Origin Notes and History:

Incorporated as the City of Kamloops 1 July 1893. Kamloops (City) confirmed 7 June 1927 on 92I/NE.
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
Kamloops celebrated its centenary in 1912 because a century earlier, in May 1812, Alexander Ross established a post at "Cumcloups" --the meeting of the waters-- at the junction of the North Thompson and South Thompson rivers. He was representing the Pacific Fur Company; his trade during the ten days of his visit was extensive, and he found himself in the midst of a good beaver country. The previous summer the Pacific Fur Company had sent David Stuart from Astoria to explore the territory lying between the Columbia and Fraser Rivers; ascending the Okanagan to the height of land he reached the South Thompson river, and was compelled to spend the winter with the Shuswap and other Indian tribes in the neighbourhood. His report led to the visit of Alexander Ross. In 1812 the Nor'Westers built a post close to that of the Astorians, whose whole undertaking was acquired in 1813. Eight years later the amalgamation of the Hudson's Bay Company with their rivals led to the establishment of the Company in Kamloops. Kamloops Post Office was opened 1872. (17th Report of the Geographic Board of Canada, 1922). See also the municipality's own website.
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
Kam-a-loo'-la-pa: point between the rivers. (George M. Dawson, Notes on the Shuswap People...., published in Transactions, Royal Society of Canada, vol IX, 1891, and in Geological Survey of Canada Annual Report Vol VII, 1894, p.404B). compare with: "Beautiful point where waters meet" (information from Isaac Harris, published in Vernon News, 18 July 1918)
Source: included with note
The meaning of this name is preserved for us by John Tod, the veteran HBC man, who in 1841 took over the fort here which had been abandoned after the murder of Chief Factor Black. In his memoirs Tod notes: "The Indians called the place 'Kahm-o-loops,' meaning 'the meeting of the waters'.
Source: Akrigg, Helen B. and Akrigg, G.P.V; British Columbia Place Names; Sono Nis Press, Victoria 1986 /or University of British Columbia Press 1997
(T)kim-loops: any confluence, meeting of waters (or people); (T)kim-lool-pa: any tributary. (Art Kuipers, The Shuswap Language, 1974, pp 61 & 213)
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
Rev. J, Goodfellow of Princeton, who is considered an authority in historical research of sections of southern BC, informated Miss Wolfenden [Provincial Library] in 1939 that Dr. Robie L. Reid of Vancouver, noted historian, had informed him that the name of Kamloops was associated with the early fur traders in the name Campe de Loup, which became in turn Kamloops (November 1944 advice from Provincial Archives).
Source: Provincial Archives of BC "Place Names File" compiled 1945-1950 by A.G. Harvey from various sources, with subsequent additions
Kamloops....'field of wolves' (Les Nomes Indiens de Mon Payes, by Fr. Joseph Guinard, OMI, p.54)
Source: included with note
Parks Canada has installed a National Historic site monument at Riverside Park in Kamloops, "...to mark the site of Fort Kamloops, and in memory of the pioneer fur traders, who, by establishing themselves in that locality, aided in securing the country for Great Britain..."
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office