BC Geographical Names

Name Details:

Name: Jarvis Pass
Feature TypeClick here for a list of
Feature Types.
:
Pass (2) - Low opening in a mountain range or hills, offering a route from one side to the other
StatusClick here for an explanation of Status.: Official
Relative Location: N of Kakwa Lake near BC-Alberta boundary, E of Prince George, Peace River Land District
Latitude-LongitudeClick here for an explanation of Position Type.: 54°05'27''N, 120°09'30''W at the approximate centre of this feature.
DatumClick here for an explanation of Datum.: NAD83
NTS MapClick here for an explanation of NTS Map.: 93I/1
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Origin Notes and History:

Adopted in the 15th Report of the Geographic Board of Canada, 31 March 1917. Name confirmed 15 December 1982 on 93I/1.
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
"E.W. Jarvis, an intrepid explorer for the proposed CPR, passed within 10 miles of [Mount Sir Alexander] in February 1875 when he discovered the pass which bears his name... (Frederick Vreeland, "Early Visits to Mount Sir Alexander", American Alpine Journal, 1930, pp 114-119 with map, copy on file V.1.33).
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
"E.W. Jarvis, CE, and Major C.F. Hanington of Ottawa made an adventurous winter journey across the Rockies in 1875. The pass through which they crossed the mountains was named Jarvis Pass by the Geographic Board of Canada and the name Jarvis is also borne by a mountain on the south side of the pass opposite Mount Hanington. The exploration was undertaken to see if this route across the mountains would be a practicable one for the Canadian Pacific Railway. The elevation of the pass, about 5,000 feet, proved too high. The starting point of the journey was Quesnel, which was left on December 9, 1974, and a 1,000-mile journey, mostly on foot, occupying five and a half months, was concluded at Winnipeg on May 21, 1875." (extract from Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, June 1927)
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office