Golden

Feature Type:Town - A populated place with legally defined boundaries, incorporated as a town municipality under the provincial Municipal Act.
Status:
Name Authority: BC Geographical Names Office
Relative Location: At junction of Kicking Horse and Columbia Rivers, NE of Revelstoke, Kootenay Land District
Latitude-Longitude: 51°17'52''N, 116°57'53''W at the approximate location of the Municipal Hall.
Datum: NAD83
NTS Map: 82N/7

Origin Notes and History:

Golden (Post Office & Railway Station) adopted 3 April 1952 on 82 N/SE, as labelled on BC map 1EM, 1915. Incorporated as a Village Municipality 26 June 1957. Re-incorporated as a Town Municipality 1 January 1967; Golden (Town) confirmed 15 December 1891 on 82 N/7.

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

So-named because when the pioneers saw it first, as they descended into the valley, it was all golden and shining in the sun. (provided by Provincial Archives c1954; source unknown.) Golden Post Office was opened 1 April 1887. See also the municipality's own website.

Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

The "Big Cache" of CPR surveyors in the early 1880's. In 1883, F.W. Aylmer, CE, changed the name to Golden City, in rivalry with a construction gang at Silver City, an abortive mining camp near Castle Mountain. (Harvey file)

Source: Provincial Archives of BC "Place Names File" compiled 1945-1950 by A.G. Harvey from various sources, with subsequent additions

"This town of Golden was named before the CPR came to the Columbia Valley. It was called this name by a man named Baptiste Morigeau, who had at the time a ranch on the east side of Lake Windermere. This man started a store on the north bank of the Kicking Horse River and packed in supplies on pack horses first from Calgary and after the railroad was built further west, he then packed in from Laggan which is now Lake Louise. The reason Golden got its name is, that at this time there was a small mining town at Castle Mountain...called Silver City, so he said he would call his location Golden, and this is how this town got its name. I have heard him tell this many times as he was by father-in-law." (2 June 1966 letter from James Lightbown, Langley)

Source: Provincial Archives of BC "Place Names File" compiled 1945-1950 by A.G. Harvey from various sources, with subsequent additions

The traditional name for this site is ?aknuqtuk, pronounced ak-nook-thook. [meaning/significance not provided] (April 2006 advice from Janice Alpine, Ktunaxa Language Program)

Source: included with note