BC Geographical Names

Name Details:

Name: Greenwood
Feature TypeClick here for a list of
Feature Types.
:
City - A populated place with legally defined boundaries, incorporated under the provincial Municipal Act
StatusClick here for an explanation of Status.: Official
Relative Location: NW of Grand Forks, Similkameen Division Yale Land District
Latitude-LongitudeClick here for an explanation of Position Type.: 49°05'18''N, 118°40'35''W at the approximate population centre of this feature.
DatumClick here for an explanation of Datum.: NAD83
NTS MapClick here for an explanation of NTS Map.: 82E/2
  Nearby names within
  

Origin Notes and History:

Incorporated as the City of Greenwood 12 July 1897. Greenwood (City) confirmed 6 October 1955 82/SW.
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
The first settler was Robert Wood in 1895. Origin indefinite, but general opinion is that as the townsite was covered with green timber and as Wood owned the townsite, Greenwood was considered an appropriate name. Post Office opened 1 March 1896. (Information provided by A.N. Mowat, postmaster; published in the 17th Report of the Geographic Board of Canada, 31 March 1921.) See also the municipality's own internet site. See also the municipality's own website.
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
C. Scott Galloway, one of the owners of the townsite, turned to his partner Robert Wood as they stood on a forested hillside. "It is a nice green wood," he said. Wood replied,"That is what we will call it"
Source: Akrigg, Helen B. and Akrigg, G.P.V; British Columbia Place Names; Sono Nis Press, Victoria 1986 /or University of British Columbia Press 1997
Named after a mining camp in the American Cordillera - most of the miners and companies operating in the boundary country were from the USA. (Rupert W. Haggen, BCLS, Origin of Place Names in Boundary District, 1945 manuscript, file H.1.45.)
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
During the Rock Creek gold rush a prospector, Charlie Wood, located gold on his claim in the hills above town. When his claim was almost played out, he injured his leg with an axe, but before seeking medical attention in Greenwood he buried his treasure between two fir trees, on a flat above his cabin. Upon his return he found the cabin and all the trees had been burnt down by a forest fire - the land was unrecognizable and he was never able to relocate his cache of gold. (condensed from "Lost Treasure in British Columbia" by L. Lazeo; Victoria 1973; presented at BC Folklore Society's website http://collections.ic.gc.ca/folklore/ )
Source: included with note