BC Geographical Names

Name Details:

Name: Capilano River
Feature TypeClick here for a list of
Feature Types.
:
River - Watercourse of variable size, which has tributaries and flows into a body of water or a larger watercourse
StatusClick here for an explanation of Status.: Official
Relative Location: Flows S through North Vancouver District Municipality into First Narrows, Burrard Inlet, New Westminster Land District
Latitude-LongitudeClick here for an explanation of Position Type.: 49°19'17''N, 123°08'22''W at the approximate mouth of this feature.
DatumClick here for an explanation of Datum.: NAD83
NTS MapClick here for an explanation of NTS Map.: 92G/6
Related MapClick here for an explanation of Related Maps.: 92G/11
92G/6
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Origin Notes and History:

Capilano Creek adopted in the 15th Report of the Geographic Board of Canada, 31 March 1917, as labelled on BC Lands' map 2B, 1914. Form of name changed to Capilano River 6 May 1947 on 92G/6.
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
"The supreme sia'm of the (Squawmish) tribe was known by the title TE Kiapila'noq, and had his headquarters at the mouth of the Homulcison creek, now called Capilano Creek."
Source: Nelson, Denys; Place Names of the Delta of the Fraser River; 1927, unpublished manuscript held in the Provincial Archives
Capilano is an adaption of a Salish word meaning "the people of Kiap", the hereditary name of the chief whose headquarters this place was.
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office
From the Indian word Kiapila'noq, name of the supreme chief of the Squamish tribe which inhabited Howe Sound and Burrard Inlet. The village at the creek's mouth was his headquarters. Chief Joe Capilano, who gave Pauline Johnson the foundation for her "Legends of Vancouver", visited England in 1906 to lay Indian grievances before King Edward VII. He died in 1910, and is buried in a mausoleum in West Vancouver.
Source: Provincial Archives of BC "Place Names File" compiled 1945-1950 by A.G. Harvey from various sources, with subsequent additions
In the graveyard at the Mission (at North Vancouver) is a fine tombstone erected to the memory of Mrs. Chief Tom and which bears the following inscription: "Sacred to the memory of Josephine, beloved wife of the late Chief Tom of the Squawmish band of Indians. Her father, Chief George Capilano, met Captain Cook in 1782 and was the first to welcome and escort Captain Vancouver into Burrard Inlet on June 14, 1792. He advised his people to follow his example in welcoming the adventurers."
Source: Nelson, Denys; Place Names of the Delta of the Fraser River; 1927, unpublished manuscript held in the Provincial Archives
Headwaters at 49 33 - 123 08 on 92G/11.
Source: Canadian Geographical Names Database, Ottawa